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سه شنبه 2 بهمن 1397
Polystyrene is an inexpensive and hard plastic, and probably only polyethylene is more common in your everyday life. The outside housing of the computer you are using now is probably made of polystyrene. Model cars and airplanes are made from polystyrene, and it also is made in the form of foam packaging and insulation (StyrofoamTM is one brand of polystyrene foam). Clear plastic drinking cups are made of polystyrene. So are a lot of the molded parts on the inside of your car, like the radio knobs. Polystyrene is also used in toys, and the housings of things like hairdryers, computers, and kitchen appliances.
Polystyrene is a vinyl polymer. Structurally, it is a long hydrocarbon chain, with a phenyl group attached to every other carbon atom. Polystyrene is produced by free radical vinyl polymerization, from the monomer styrene.


This is a better picture of what the monomer styrene looks like:



The model above is an image of the pdb model you can view
by clicking here or you can just click on the image itself.
Either way, be sure to close the new window that opens up
with the 3D model in it when you are ready to come back here.
Go ahead, play with it!

Polystyrene is also a component of a type of hard rubber called poly(styrene-butadiene-styrene), or SBS rubber. SBS rubber is a thermoplastic elastomer.

The Polystyrene of the Future
There's a new kind of polystyrene out there, called syndiotactic polystyrene. It's different because the phenyl groups on the polymer chain are attached to alternating sides of the polymer backbone chain. "Normal" or atactic polystyrene has no order with regard to the side of the chain on which the phenyl groups are attached.


You can see the new syndiotactic polystyrene alongside the old atactic polystyrene in 3-D by clicking here. The new syndiotactic polystyrene is crystalline, and melts at 270 oC.
But it's a lot more expensive!
Syndiotactic polystyrene is made by metallocene catalysis polymerization.


Go Ahead, Hit It Hard!
But there are still some fun things you can do with old fashioned atactic polystyrene. Wanna see something really nift-o-matic?

What would happen if we were to take some styrene monomer, and polymerize it free radically, but let's say we put some polybutadiene rubber in the mix. Take a look at polybutadiene, and you'll see that it has double bonds in it that can polymerize. We end up with the polybutadiene copolymerizing with the styrene monomer, to get a type of copolymer called a graft copolymer. This is a polymer with polymer chains growing out of it, and which are a different kind of polymer than the backbone chain. In this case, it's a polystyrene chain with chains of polybutadiene growing out of it.

Polystyrene is an inexpensive and hard plastic, and probably only polyethylene is more common in your everyday life. The outside housing of the computer you are using now is probably made of polystyrene. Model cars and airplanes are made from polystyrene, and it also is made in the form of foam packaging and insulation (StyrofoamTM is one brand of polystyrene foam). Clear plastic drinking cups are made of polystyrene. So are a lot of the molded parts on the inside of your car, like the radio knobs. Polystyrene is also used in toys, and the housings of things like hairdryers, computers, and kitchen appliances.
Polystyrene is a vinyl polymer. Structurally, it is a long hydrocarbon chain, with a phenyl group attached to every other carbon atom. Polystyrene is produced by free radical vinyl polymerization, from the monomer styrene.


This is a better picture of what the monomer styrene looks like:



The model above is an image of the pdb model you can view
by clicking here or you can just click on the image itself.
Either way, be sure to close the new window that opens up
with the 3D model in it when you are ready to come back here.
Go ahead, play with it!

Polystyrene is also a component of a type of hard rubber called poly(styrene-butadiene-styrene), or SBS rubber. SBS rubber is a thermoplastic elastomer.

The Polystyrene of the Future
There's a new kind of polystyrene out there, called syndiotactic polystyrene. It's different because the phenyl groups on the polymer chain are attached to alternating sides of the polymer backbone chain. "Normal" or atactic polystyrene has no order with regard to the side of the chain on which the phenyl groups are attached.


You can see the new syndiotactic polystyrene alongside the old atactic polystyrene in 3-D by clicking here. The new syndiotactic polystyrene is crystalline, and melts at 270 oC.
But it's a lot more expensive!
Syndiotactic polystyrene is made by metallocene catalysis polymerization.


Go Ahead, Hit It Hard!
But there are still some fun things you can do with old fashioned atactic polystyrene. Wanna see something really nift-o-matic?

What would happen if we were to take some styrene monomer, and polymerize it free radically, but let's say we put some polybutadiene rubber in the mix. Take a l



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